Falling Walls Lab Tokyo 2019

 

Falling Walls Lab Tokyo 2019

13 June 18:30 - 21:30, ELSI, Tokyo (access)

please sign me in as audience!

 

Learn, share and communicate about research

The Falling Walls Lab Tokyo will take place on 13 June 2019 at ELSI, Tokyo Institute of Technology!

Based on the idea of "breaking down various walls" around the world, this event provides students, young researchers and professionals of all disciplines and nationalities an opportunity to present their research projects or ideas in 3 minutes and in English, in front of a non-specialised audience. To be invited to Tokyo, candidates must pass a pre-selection via our call for applications.

The winners from the Falling Walls Labs from around the world - including the Falling Walls Lab Tokyo - will gather for the Falling Walls Lab Finale in Berlin in November. The Falling Walls initiative was founded to commemorate the fall of the Berlin Wall.

 

How was your experience at the Finale in Berlin?

'The finale in Berlin is an amazing opportunity, at so many levels. It’s obviously great to win, but even if you don’t, it doesn’t matter, because being there already feels like you’ve won the prize. Apart from the finale, where the 100 finalists competed, we were able to listen to the actual Falling Walls Conference talks, which were so inspiring, and network with the speakers and attendees during the breaks. I also went on a bunch of brain dates. In short: lots of interesting discussions, amazing people and I’ve really expanded my network!'

Ana Verissimo, winner of FWLT2017 and participant in the FWL Finale in Berlin in November 2017

READ ANA'S FULL INTERVIEW HERE

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研究 × コミュニケーション

国際科学コミュニケーションイベントFalling Walls Labが東京で2019年6月13日(木)に開催されます!

本イベントでは、世界にある「様々な壁」を打破することをコンセプトに、様々な国籍や専門分野の若手研究者が3分間で自身の研究活動を英語で紹介します。東京をはじめ、世界各地で予選を勝ち抜いた入賞者が11月にベルリンで行われる決勝大会に集結します。

 


Organisers:

 

 

Host and Partner Organisation:

 

 


 

 

Partner events:

Scientific Communication In Practice 2019, 13 June ELSI
More info: bit.ly/SCIP2019Japan

Falling Walls Lab Sendai 2019, late Summer, Tohoku University
More info: tfc.tohoku.ac.jp/fwls

 

 

 

Entry Conditions

Bachelor and Master students (provided they are working on a research project on their own), PhD candidates, postdocs, young professionals and entrepreneurs from all nationalities and scientific disciplines are invited to apply.

  • Applicants with only a Bachelor’s degree: the degree should not date back more than 10 years.
  • Applicants with a Master’s degree: the degree should not date back more than 7 years.
  • Applicants with a PhD: the degree should not date back more than 5 years.
  • Postdocs and students which are currently enrolled in university are also eligible to apply.

 

Pre selection Procedure

All the applications will be handled through the Falling Walls website.

The application deadline is 13 May 2019, 16:00 Tokyo time.​

The organisers will select 10 to 15 participants from these applications and invite (travel & accomodation covered) them to the Falling Walls Lab Tokyo 2019 on 13 June in Tokyo.

 

What's in it for the applicants?

Working on presenting your research project is never a loss of time! Apply to the FWLT and you will definitely be able to better conceptualise your research to your colleagues, and to the general public.
For the selected participants, in addition to being invited to the Tokyo event, they will be granted access to specific training materials on science communication.
Among participants, prizes will be given to a top three as selected by the Jury Committee on the day of the event:
+ First prize: trip to berlin for the Falling Walls Lab Finale and Conference on 8-9 November (where the winners of the Tokyo event will present in front of hundreds of executives, investors or policy-makers)
+ Second & Third prizes TBA

 

What's in it for the participants in Falling Walls Lab Tokyo?

'Just the experience you gain from preparing, practicing and performing is very valuable. Also, it’s a great way of learning about new subjects, observe how your peers present their work and even get some ideas for your own future presentations. The event is relatively small and the audience and juries are very friendly, so it’s a great atmosphere to prepare you for bigger events. Needless to say, if you win, you get to go to Berlin and compete at the final representing Japan!'

Ana Verissimo, winner of FWLT2017, at the event in Tokyo on 27 May 2017

READ ANA'S FULL INTERVIEW HERE

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deadline is passed!

What should I prepare for my application?

(All fields are mandatory except specifically marked)

- Personal information, affilation and position, contact information;

- Past publications, awards and scholarships (optional);

- A tagline of your project: "Breaking the Wall of ... +40 characters maximum including spaces";

- A teaser of your project, in 50 characters maximum,including spaces;

- An outline of your idea/project: 200 characters maximum spaces included for the problem you address, and 200 characters maximum spaces included to present your solution;

- A short statement about your motivation in applying to the Falling Walls Lab (400 characters maximum including spaces);

- A CV in PDF format.

Hints & tips: how to draft a good FWLT abstract (FWLT2018 training session)

How to prepare a good abstract to apply to FWLT?

'Practice and perfect! For example, you can think about these questions: what is my research about and what is its main goal? Or, what will it do for others or the planet? If you already have a great result, what is it and why is it important? If you have a great idea, what’s the potential and impact? Then, choose keywords that describe that in a simple, concise, catchy way.'

Ana Verissimo, winner of FWLT2017, at the Finale in Berlin in November 2017 (Photo credit: Falling Walls)

READ ANA'S FULL INTERVIEW HERE

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How to prepare a good talk?

If you pass the pre-selections, we'll try and provide you with tips and know-how for better preparing yourselves. Meanwhile, please have a look at the following resource-filled article.
You can also watch last edition's talks in video:

 

 

How to prepare a good talk for the FWLT?

'Thinking about the questions above can also help preparing for your talk. Also, you can get inspiration from watching videos from previous editions of Falling Walls Lab or other great science communicators on Youtube. Think about how you can be different/original, but in a style that you feel at ease with. Don’t try to memorize everything and use long and complicated words, prepare your slides in a way that they are simple and effective and serve as prompters to guide you through what you have to say. Do a little research on the impact of your first sentence and how you wrap up the talk with an equally memorable sentence. It’s not about how many words or sentences you can fit in 3 minutes, but the impact and the emphasis you put on each one. Don’t forget to have fun!'

Ana Verissimo, winner of FWLT2017, at the Finale in Berlin in November 2017 (Photo credit: Falling Walls)

READ ANA'S FULL INTERVIEW HERE

ana_verissimo_4.png

 

 

 

How does judging work?

Our distinguished Jury will deliberate to select the best talks. Two participants will be designated as winners and will travel to the global Falling Walls Lab Finale, which takes place on 8 November 2019 in Berlin.

For this purpose they will use three criteria of equal importance: the "Breakthrough factor", the "Relevance and Impact", and the "Structure and Performance" of the talk. English literacy is not a valid criterion, as long as the speaker makes herself or himself clearly understand.

 

 

Who is in the Jury?

Dr. Jörg Schneider

Director of Division „International Affairs“ and Head of Division DFG Office Japan, German Research Foundation (DFG)

1991: Scientific Officer at the Project Management Team, German Research Ministry at the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft und Raumfahrt (DLR)

1992: Establishment of the German National Contact Point for Human Capital and Mobility (HCM) in Framework Programme FP3. Until 1999 head of national contact point for European mobility, socio-economics and international cooperation pograms

1999: Managing Director, Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (WGL)

2003: Head of Division “Research Training Groups, Graduate Schools, Research Careers“ at Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)

since 2006 - present: Head of Division “International Affairs”, German Research Foundation (DFG)

since 2014 - present : Head of Division, DFG Office Japan

 

 

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Prof. Akemi Yokota

Associate Professor, Graduate School of Social Science, Chiba University

2012 – 2013: Researcher, Institute of Administrative Management (IAM)

2013 – 2014: Associate Professor, Faculty of Law and Economics, Chiba University

2014 – 2017: Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Politics, and Economics, Chiba University

since 2017: Associate Professor, Graduate School of Social Sciences, Chiba University

 

 

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Prof. Dr. Yoshiaki Maeda

Vice Director and Professor, Tohoku Forum for Creativity, Tohoku University

1986 - 1994: Associate Professor, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University

1994 - 2014: Professor, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University

2008 - present: Honorary Professor, University of Warwick

since 2014 - present: Professor, Tohoku University,

since 2014 - present: Vice Director, Tohoku Forum for Creativity, Tohoku University

 

 

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Prof. Dr. Mary Voytek

Special Advisor to the President of Tokyo Institute of Technology, Executive Director of Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI)

 

2018-present Executive Director Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology

2018-present Cross appointment with Columbia University, Astrobiology

2015-present Interagency Committee on Microbiomes

2008-present Senior Scientist for Astrobiology, Planetary Sciences Division, SMD, NASA

1998-2010 Project Chief Environmental Microbiology, Water Resources Division, National Research Program, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

 

 

 

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Ms. Sabine Schenk

Coordinator, Heidelberg University Office, Kyoto

2017 Award of the Takehisa Yumeji Society

Since 2015: Coordinator of the HUOK, Heidelberg University’s liaison office for Japan and East Asia

2013 - 2018: Visiting lectureships at LMU Munich, Heidelberg University and Ritsumeikan University

2012 – 2014: Assistant Liaison Office and Project Coordinator at the Cluster of Excellence “Asia and Europe”, Heidelberg University

2010 - 2011: PhD research at the German Institute for Japanese Studies, Tokyo

2009 – 2010: Assistant Curator, Clark Center of Japanese Art and Culture (DIJ), California

2008 Master in Japanese Studies, Art History and German Literature at LMU Munich with an exchange year at Kyoto University

 

 

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Dr. Kazuhiro Sakurada

Deputy Program Director, Medical Science Innovation Hub Program, RIKEN

1988 - 2000: Researcher, Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co. Ltd

2000 - 2004: Principle investigator of Laboratory of Regenerative Medicine, Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co. Ltd

2004 - 2006: Head of Research Center Japan (Member of Corporate Research Management Team), Schering AG

2006 - 2007: Head of Global Drug Discovery Regenerative Medicine, Bayer Schering Pharma AG

since 2008: Chief Scientific Officer, iZumi Bio Inc.

2008 - 2018: Senior Researcher, Sony Computer Science Laboratories Inc.

 

 

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Mr Luca Escoffier

Project Manager, EU-Japan Technology Transfer Helpdesk, EU-Japan Centre for Industrial Cooperation

 

Feb 2019 - present: Co-founder and CEO, LCUBE Consulting

Dec 2015 - present: Chair of the Chapter on Open Innovation and Entrepreneurship, ISSNAF - Italian Scientists and Scholars of North America

Jul 2015 - present: Project Manager, EU-Japan Centre for Industrial Cooperation

Jul 2010 - present: Co-founder and CEO, Usque Ad Sidera LLC

 

 

 

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Who are the participants?​​

Ward Peeters

Kanda University of International Studies

Breaking the Wall of collaborative learning on social media

Riku Yamada

Grubin Inc.

Breaking the Wall of food loss

Meiling Sun

Tokyo Institute of Technology

Breaking the Wall of Terahertz-based industrial inspection

Ryogo Utaki

Tokyo Institute of Technology

Breaking the Wall of noninvasive health care monitoring

Collin Stecker

Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology

Breaking the Wall of affordable, flexible, renewable energy

Momoko Obuki

Osaka Prefecture University

Breaking the Wall of cancer membranes for drug delivery

Sakita Koki

Okayama University

Breaking the Wall of disaster prevention

Alannah Paulina Prondzinsky

Tokyo Institute of Technology

Breaking the Wall of understanding life’s limits

Yu Tokumoto

Tokyo Institute of Technology

Breaking the Wall of wearable biological monitoring

Likhith Manjunatha

Kyushu University

Breaking the Wall of experimental search time

Kou Li

Tokyo Institute of Technology

Breaking the Wall of ubiquitous inspection robot

John Martin

NanoCarrier

Breaking the Wall of cancer drug ineffectiveness

Go Takahasahi

Waseda University

Breaking the Wall of green governance in Myanmar community

Xiu Zhao

Waseda University

Breaking the Wall of humans and robots working together

 

 

 

 

Registration desk opens at 18:15. Attendees, come in advance if you want a good seat!

  Programme

18:30

Welcome Address & Opening Remarks

Konstanze Lang, Program Coordinator, German Centre for Research and Innovation Tokyo (DWIH Tokyo)

Matthieu Py, Representative, EURAXESS Japan

18:45

Talks by FWLT 2019 contestants

(first batch, see order within 'participants' tab)

19:35

Talks by FWLT 2019 contestants

(second batch, see order within 'participants' tab)

20:15

Catch & Tell

Facilitator: Thilina Heenatigala, ELSI

 

20:45

Results announcement and prize ceremony

 

  21:00 Networking Reception