22/02/2022

CALL FOR RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP - CFisUC - L791687

This job offer has expired


  • ORGANISATION/COMPANY
    Universidade de Coimbra
  • RESEARCH FIELD
    Other
  • RESEARCHER PROFILE
    First Stage Researcher (R1)
  • APPLICATION DEADLINE
    09/03/2022 23:00 - Europe/London
  • LOCATION
    Portugal › Coimbra
  • TYPE OF CONTRACT
    Temporary
  • JOB STATUS
    Full-time
  • HOURS PER WEEK
    35
  • OFFER STARTING DATE
    01/04/2022

OFFER DESCRIPTION

CALL FOR RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP – LUGUS 781687

 

University of Coimbra opens a call for 5 (five) research fellowship, in the framework of the R&D Unit “CFisUC - Centro de Física da Universidade de Coimbra (reference: UIDB/04564/2020), financed by Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, I.P./MCTES through national funds (PIDDAC), in the following conditions:

 

Scientific area: Physics, Physics Engineering, Biomedical Engineering.

 

Skills/Qualifications/Admission requirements: Students with bachelor’s degree (Licenciatura) in the areas of Physics, Physical Engineering Sciences, Biomedical Engineering Sciences or Chemistry, enrolled in Masters in Biomedical Engineering, Masters in Physics, Masters in Physical Engineering, Master in Computational Biology or Master in Astrophysics and Instrumentation for Space .

 

Although the recipients must be enrolled in a cycle of studies leading to the attribution of an academic degree, at the time of application it is not necessary for the candidate to have made such an enrollment, and proof of enrollment must be presented until the fellowship is contractualized. Candidates are only required to meet the requirements to enroll in the training offer. If there are candidates already enrolled (including attending a course), they compete on an equal footing with those who are not enrolled.

 

 

Work plan/ Objectives: Research Fellowship within one of the following projects:

 

Project 1 – Fibrosis and Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a condition that affects between 7% and 10% of women during their lifetime. It is characterized by the presence of endometrium outside the uterus in the form of small patches. These patches bleed during menstruation, and their recurrent healing process results in the growth of patches and the development of fibrous tissue, sometimes leading to adhesion between internal organs. In the past, we have developed several computational models that characterize vascular growth in various pathologies. These models could be used to better understand the healing and growth processes of endometriosis patches.

 

Aim: the student will develop a computational model that investigates the role of changing tissue stiffness in the vascularization of an endometriosis patch.

 

The project will have the following steps:

=> Development of a computational model of angiogenesis that takes into account the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix.

=> Simulation of neo-vascularization in a patch, considering the mechanical changes that are a consequence of successive healing processes.

=> Conclusions regarding the role of fibrosis in disease progression.

 

Project 2 – Endothelial cells' dynamics

Angiogenesis, the process by which new blood vessels grow from pre-existing vessels, plays a crucial role in organogenesis, wound healing, inflammation, as well as in several diseases such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and diabetes. To better understand the growth of vessels, we need to explore how endothelial cells interact with each other and with the matrix. In a new blood vessel, the cells adhere to each other and to the basement membrane to form a tubular structure. The mechanisms behind this lumen formation process still need to be understood.

 

Aim: In this project, the student will use a new computational model for cell dynamics and vessel formation to simulate the rearrangement of cells during vascular growth. This computational implementation is a multi-phase-field model, MPFM, simulating each cell individually, as well as the adhesion between them and the pressure exerted by the blood.

 

The project will follow the following steps:

=> Program the MPFM taking into account the vessel endothelial cells, the lumen and the basement membrane;

=> Exploring computationally how endothelial cells reorganize in the vessel when a single cell is advected along the longitudinal direction of the vessel. Establish the limits of lumen integrity in this situation.

=> Extrapolate the findings to the case where cells reorganize during lumen formation during vascular development.

 

Project 3 – Computational modeling of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer (PCa) is a very relevant pathology in the health of men during aging. Although these tumors usually do not pose a threat to the patient, in most cases PCa leads to radical treatment after diagnosis (e.g. surgery or radiotherapy). The treatment of prostate cancer would benefit from a personalization of the clinical process beyond the definition of the risk group. Recently, computational methods for simulating cancer growth and treatment have allowed personalized prediction of clinical outcomes and planning of optimal therapies, for example for breast and brain cancer. In this project we will extend this personalization technique to prostate cancer.

 

Aim: Development of a computational model of prostate cancer taking into account the mechanical stress of the tissue as well as the development of tumor vascularization.

 

The project will follow the following steps:

=> Development of computational model of irrigation produced by 3D networks of capillary vessels built in silico. From this set of vascular networks, those capable of irrigating all regions of the tissue will be selected.

=> Include irrigation in existing 3D models of prostate cancer development.

=> Exploring prostate cancer computational model parameters and preparing the model to be parameterized using patient MRI images.

 

Project 4 – Development of a computational model of the bioelectric state of tissues and cancer initiation

The results obtained in 50 years of the “War on Cancer”, with an enormous investment of human and material resources, can only be considered modest. The standard model of cancer initiation, the Somatic Mutation Theory (SMT), has been repeatedly challenged by contradictory observational results. Thus, other alternatives are being considered, such as the Field Theory of Tissue Organization (TOFT), in which this work is inserted. The idea behind this Project is to explain computationally, and compare with new experimental data, the initiation of a tumor as a disturbance in the bioelectrical state of cells. This disturbance, by disorganizing the tissue, leads to an uncontrolled proliferation of cells and the appearance of a tumoral lesion. The computational model to be developed will allow not only to test this hypothesis but also to provide indications for tumor behavior reversal strategies, through the use of therapies aimed at cellular ion channels.

The bioelectrical properties of cells, determined by the activity of ion channels and pumps (for different ions, such as Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-) as well as gap junctions, are important to understand the behavior of cells and the state of tissues. In this project, the student will participate in the development of a computational model that describes the bioelectric state of cells and tissues, as well as the processes that lead to cell polarization and depolarization. Knowing that cell depolarization (with an almost zero electrical potential value across the cell membrane) is associated with increased cell proliferation, its dysregulation could lead to the appearance of cancer.

 

Project 5 – Computational model of the development and invasion of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

Modeling the temporal development of a tumor makes it possible to test the knowledge about the processes that lead to its growth and, taking into account the different factors on which it depends, predict different end states. From this knowledge, strategies for therapies and for predicting the result of some medical procedures or the effect of certain drugs can be designed. Diffuse gastric tumor is a rare type of cancer characterized by loss of expression of E-cadherin, a protein responsible for cell adhesion. By losing this membrane protein, the epithelial cells of the stomach gain increased mobility and the ability to pass the basement membrane and invade tissues in the abdominal cavity. In this way they can lead to the appearance of gastric cancer.

In this project, the student will participate in the development of a model for the early stages of evolution of a diffuse gastric tumor and compare the results obtained in silico with those obtained in in vitro cultures and in in vivo animal models. It will start by modeling the in vitro behavior of cell cultures from a diffuse gastric tumor, comparing the results obtained with normal epithelial cells with those with different mutations in E-cadherin expression. The model to be used is a discrete model (“Cellular Potts Model”) coupled with a model of cellular forces in the cell monolayer in culture. This project aims to adjust the parameters and processes involved in the simulation to reproduce the experimental results obtained by biologists and physicians in experiments at I3S, Porto.

 

Project 6 – Organism theory: computational model

Contrary to what happens in Physics, Biology has not developed testable basic theories about the functioning and organization of living beings, from the subcellular level to the formation of organisms, passing through the organization of tissues and associated pathologies. A theory that is experimentally verifiable is essential to guide the experiments to be carried out and thus obtain new knowledge, making the Life Sciences advance more quickly. In the absence of a theory or model, the interpretation of the enormous amount of data collected in numerous experiments is much more difficult and the evolution of therapies slower. Several researchers have proposed a “Theory of Organisms” based on simple premises, such as the normal state of cells being proliferation and mobility, with variation, and the principle of organization through restrictions. The hypotheses raised by this theory can be implemented and tested in computational models. These can start with a simple cellular automaton and successive levels of complexity can be introduced, in particular with regard to the conditions and restrictions to be imposed, allowing to bring the model closer to reality and thus testing the starting hypotheses. The student will participate in the development and testing of these computational models, and in their comparison with biological reality, in particular in the growth of a simple organism and pattern formation.

 

Project 7 – Investigating the variable sources detected by the Gaia mission (ESA)

It is intended to characterize the extragalactic objects detected by the Gaia mission of the European Space Agency, and cataloged as variable sources. The Gaia mission, launched in December 2013, is since July 2014 operating regularly, having obtained billions of observations, which are public. In this period, a list of variable sources has already been identified, part being extragalactic sources. It is intended to investigate within these the presence of binary systems of galaxies that harbor supermassive black holes. Systems that are identified will later be analyzed as part of a multi-frequency study, which will include their spectral energy distribution (SED), type of host galaxy and radio band emission.

Summary of activities to be carried out: Throughout the project, it will be necessary to obtain and analyze data (images, photometry, spectra) available in the databases of large sky surveys from different telescopes. This includes software learning, at the level of data management and visualization (eg TOPCAT, ALADIN), production of SEDs (eg SEDbuilder), production of galaxy profiles (eg GALFIT).

 

Project 8 – Investigating galaxies with displaced supermassive black holes

According to models of galactic evolution, massive galaxies are built by merging smaller galaxies, many of which harbor supermassive black holes at their center. In this scenario, there are periods when melting systems are formed by pairs of supermassive black holes, which will eventually merge into one. At the moment of fusion, gravitational waves are emitted, which cause movement in the resulting supermassive black hole (SMBH), which is thus displaced from its initial position. However, only less than a dozen displaced supermassive black holes have been reported in the literature, which contrasts with what is predicted by the evolution models of these systems. Based on a new selection method, we have identified a set of excellent displaced SMBH candidates, for which a detailed analysis of the morphology of the respective galaxies in the most central region is now required. Those systems that are confirmed as displaced will be globally characterized, in terms of spectral energy distributions (SED), and large-scale properties.

Summary of activities to be carried out: Throughout the project, it will be necessary to obtain and analyze data (images, photometry, spectra) available in the databases of large sky surveys from different telescopes. This includes software learning, at the level of data management and visualization (eg TOPCAT, ALADIN), production of SEDs (eg SEDbuilder), production of galaxy profiles (eg GALFIT).

 

Project 9 – Impact of dark matter on properties of compact stars

Despite intensive searches for the particle nature of dark matter (DM) its true nature still remains unknown. Until now, terrestrial experiments and direct searches of the DM annihilation have not yet found a suitable DM candidate. Hence, there is large interest to use astrophysical systems for the search for DM. Compact objects, such as neutron stars are especially attractive in this context, because they can accumulate a sizable amount of DM in their stellar interior. The presence of DM inside the neutron star core might have a measurable effect considering NS masses and radii.

The focus of the project is the study of the impact of DM on properties of neutron stars and further comparison with the existing astrophysical data.

 

Project 10 – Cooling of compact stars

The compact astrophysical objects, such as neutron stars, are the most dense physical objects accessible by the direct observations. Despite the flourishing of astrophysical observations, the particle composition of the interior of compact stars is still very poorly known. Studying of the thermal evolution of neutron stars is the primary goal of the present research project. A student will model cooling of compact stars for different star's mass and different interaction channels between particles. Modelling results will help us to answer to an important question about internal composition of neutron stars.

 

Project 11 – Lattice computation of the Kugo-Ojima function

Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describes the interaction between quarks and gluons which is responsible for the formation of hadrons, such as protons and neutrons, and that explains the mass of the Universe. Despite its success, there are some properties of QCD that are not yet understood, such as quark and gluon confinement.

Confinement refers to the experimental fact that free quarks or gluons are not observed in Nature. Any attempt to separate the constituents of hadrons results in the production of more hadrons, without ever isolating a quark or gluon.

The study of the low energy regime of QCD and associated phenomena such as confinement and chiral symmetry breaking is beyond the scope of the perturbative solution of the theory. One of the most promising approaches to study the non-perturbative regime of QCD is based on the formulation of the theory in a finite space-time lattice. Lattice QCD computations require the use of supercomputers, which in our case implies the intensive use of Navigator, the supercomputer of the University of Coimbra.

In this project we intend to investigate one of the proposed confinement mechanisms, which involves the determination of the Kugo-Ojima function. This function is related to the BRST symmetry of QCD and, according to the criterion of these two authors, in momentum space the function must be, at zero momentum, u(0)=-1 if there is confinement and if the BRST invariance is a symmetry of the strong interaction. Therefore, our goal is to perform a high statistical lattice calculation in a sizeable physical volume which would allow to discriminate the behavior of the Kugo-Ojima function at low momenta.

 

Project 12 – PT-QED

One of the axioms of the usual formulation of Quantum Mechanics tells us that the observables, which include the Hamiltonian of the system, must be self-adjoint operators in order to guarantee that their eigenvalues are real. It was found that this axiom can be replaced by the invariance of the theory under the joint action of discrete symmetries parity and time inversion. At low dimensions it was shown that Quantum Electrodynamics can be formulated using only this invariance (PT-QED) without losing its essential characteristics. In this project we intend to study the simplest Green functions in PT-QED, going beyond the perturbative approach, in an attempt to understand the differences between PT-QED and usual QED.

 

Project 13 – Deep generative models for materials discovery

A framework capable of finding a material with specific desired properties is the ultimate goal in materials’ science. Machine learning methods are seen as promising tools in accelerating materials discovery process, by assisting the traditional, and computationally demanding, high-throughput screening based on ab-initio calculations. Generative adversarial networks (GANs) are a powerful generative model capable of generating materials with specific properties. This capacity of generating new materials is possible because GANs learn the distribution of the dataset, composed of materials and properties, allowing new points to be sampled (from the learned distribution). Furthermore, with conditional GANs, we are able to sample new materials that are conditioned on a chosen target property. The objective of this project is to explore these generative models for a specific dataset (using python-based libraries).

 

Project 14 – Nuclear matteer properties: Supervised Machine Learning Approach

The properties of neutron stars are deeply connected to the properties of nuclear matter. The connection is somehow encoded in the equation of state (EOS) of the neutron star matter. Very recent observatins of neutron stars, from gravitational waves of binary neutron stars (LIGO/Virgo observatories) or the X-ray spectrum (NICER experiment), allows one to restrict the possible behaviour of the neutron star EOS. However, an additional step is required to understand the allowed properties of the nuclear force from the restricted space of the neutron star EOS. The present project aims to bridge this gap by applying supervised machine learning methods to a huge dataset of all possible nuclear matter properties and respective neutron stars EOS.

 

Project 15 – Cosmological generation of dark matter and baryonic matter

The student will develop a study of dark matter and baryonic matter cogeneration mechanisms in the history of the Universe, based on extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. The focus of the study will be theoretical models that explain the similar abundance of these two types of matter, exploring their cosmological dynamics and impact as well as their potential astrophysical signatures.

 

Project 16 – Superradiant instabilities of primordial black holes

 

The student will develop a study of the superradiant instabilities of primordial black holes, namely those associated with the production of axons and other exotic particles. The study will include an analysis of the cosmological dynamics of these instabilities, as well as potentially other processes relevant to the dynamics of black holes, exploring their impact on solving open problems in cosmology and possible astrophysical signatures.

 

Project 17 – Calculation of superconducting properties of materials

The main objective of this project is the calculation of the critical temperature (Tc) of a few new candidate superconducting materials.

The project will start with the full characterization of a well known conventional superconductor - MgB2. This includes convergence tests, geometry optimization, and the calculation of the band structure, density of states, fermi surface, phonon spectra and electron-phonon coefficients. Later, the same procedure will be applied for a set of new materials.

Overall, this project focuses on learning how to calculate the electron-phonon coefficients, and running a few long and computationally intensive calculations using high performance computing (HPC), with very little to no coding required.

 

Project 18 – Phase diagram of high-pressure ternary compounds

Since a few years ago researchers have started seeing a tendency for record breaking of the critical temperature of high temperature superconductors under high pressure. For example, room-temperature superconductivity was claimed in a photochemically synthesized ternary carbonaceous sulfur hydride system (H-C-S) at 15 degrees C and 267 GPa. However, given the high pressure apparatus used researchers are often unable to determine the crystal structure of these superconductor compounds. This is one of the many examples where theory and computation play well with experiment: because we are not limited by apparatus we can help in discovering the structure of these new compounds. We do this using specialized methods to search for the lowest energy structure of a given composition, an approach called crystal structure prediction (CSP).

The goal of the project is to use CSP methods to find new materials that are stable at high-pressure. To do this you will (i) learn how to use a density-functional theory code, (ii) learn the basics about structure prediction, namely the Minima Hopping Method (iii) be introduced to high performance computing and (iv) characterize materials. Depending on the evolution of the project and on the results obtained, the calculation of electron-phonon coefficients or the study of different thernary systems may also be required. These tasks are mostly of a numerical nature, with none to very little code development, along with some scripting.

 

Project 19 – Study of the generation of Magnons in a Ni (111) slab

Magnons are quantised spin-waves associated with the flip of a single spin. Thus, spin-waves are collective magnetic excitations. In a Heisenberg model, we can consider spin-waves as synchronic precession of the spin vectors in the magnetically ordered system. Moreover, the waveform of the spin-waves results from the constant phase difference between the spins.

The main objective of this project is to study the propagation of spin-waves in a Ni(111) slab using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). To do this you (i) will learn how to use a real space TDDFT code (octopus) for periodic systems, (ii) learn how to use a computer cluster to run calculations, (iii) learn how to work with low-dimension (2D) systems, (iv) learn how to work with magnetic systems and (v) study the propagation of spin-waves in the Ni(111) slab.

The nature of this work is purely computational, with no code or theory development associated. A background in DFT/electronic structure, as well as being comfortable with Linux systems is recommended.

 

Project 20 – Plasmons and Magneto Plasmons in graphene nanodisks

Plasmons are collective oscillations of the electronic density, whose use has a vast potential in solar cells and as a current generator that we can induce using light. Often researchers simulate plasmons classically, using the Drude model and Maxwell’s equations. However, at the nanoscale, the classic methodology fails, and a quantum mechanical description is required. The typical example for this situation is graphene, the two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon. Graphene plasmons can be modulated by static magnetic fields, where the collective excitations assisted by cyclotron resonance will appear.

This project aims to study the generation of plasmons and magneto plasmons in nanodisks of graphene. The main tasks will be (i) building the tools for the construction of graphene nanodisk, (ii) will learn how to use a real space TDDFT code (octopus) for periodic systems, (iii) learn how to use a computer cluster to run calculations, (iv) study the variation of the plasmon energy with the disk radius, (v) study the effect of adding a magnetic field in the plasmon energy and (vi) study the effect of doping the graphene nanodisk in the energy of the magneto plasmon.

This project is almost entirely computational in nature, although there will also be some scripting in the Python language present. Being familiar with Python and Linux systems is recommended.

 

Project 21 – Study of topological materials

Topological insulators are materials that present a gap in their interior, but show conducting states at their surfaces. They are one of the current trends in solid state research, often cited as a promise for the development of new technologies like spintronics.

This project will require you to (i) learn the theoretical basis of topological insulators, (ii) learn to use ab-initio electronic structure codes, (iii) learn to compute the topological invariants based on Wannier/tight-binding codes, starting with Bi2Se3/Bi2Te3, (iv) study the topology of dichalcogenide alloys.

Overall this means that the emphasis of the project lies in learning the theoretical basis and how to use codes/run calculations, without theory or code development associated.

 

Project 22 – Characterization of neutral and charged muonium in chalcopyrites used as solar cell materials

The main objective of this project is the analysis of data obtained in muon spin spectroscopy experiments at the ISIS Neutron and Muon Facility, UK, in March/2020. The measurements were performed in varying geometries (zero applied magnetic field, longitudinal field and transverse field) and temperatures (10 to 600K). The obejctive is to characterize ths muonium Mu0 and Mu+ states as analogues of the isolated hydrogen states H0 and H+, as well as to understand the muonium formation processes.

 

Regime: The attribution of the fellowship does not generate or entitle a relation of a legal-labour nature, and the fellowship is undertaken in an exclusive dedication regime. The fellowship holder is awarded the Fellowship Statute of the UC, in its current wording, according to the Research Fellowship Holder Statute , and according to the Regulation for Research Fellowships of the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, I.P., both in their current wording.

 

Location: Centre for Physics of the University of Coimbra (CFisUC) - Department of Physics,

Faculty of Science and Technology at the University of Coimbra.

 

Duration: 6 months.

 

Renewal: Eventually renewable.

 

Scientific orientation: Proposal of scientific orientation for each project:

 

Project 1 – Fibrosis and Endometriosis

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics, Physics Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Computational Biology, Medical Physics

Scientific orientation: Professor Doutor Rui Travasso e Mestre Marcos Gouveia

 

Project 2 – Cell dynamics in a blood vessel

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics, Physics Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Computational Biology, Medical Physics

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor Rui Travasso e Mestre Marcos Gouveia

 

Project 3 – Computational Modeling of Prostate Cancer

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics, Physics Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Computational Biology, Medical Physics

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor João Carvalho e Professor Doutor Rui Travasso

 

Project 4 – Development of a computational model of the bioelectric state of tissues and cancer initiation

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in biomedical engineering, master’s in physics and master’s in physical engineering and related areas

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor João Carvalho

 

Project 5 – Computational model of the development and invasion of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in biomedical engineering, master’s in physics and master’s in physical engineering and related areas

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor João Carvalho e Professor Doutor Rui Travasso

 

Project 6 – Organism theory: computational model

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in biomedical engineering, master’s in physics and master’s in physical engineering and related areas

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor João Carvalho

 

Project 7 – Investigating the variable sources detected by the Gaia mission (ESA)Target: Students enrolled in Integrated master’s in physics, Astrophysics and Instrumentation for Space, Physical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and related areas

Scientifc orientation: Doutora Sonia Antón

 

Project 8 – Investigating galaxies with displaced supermassive black holesTarget: Students enrolled in Integrated master’s in physics, Astrophysics and Instrumentation for Space, Physical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and related areas

Scientifc orientation: Doutora Sonia Antón

 

Project 9 – Impact of dark matter on properties of compact stars

Target: Students enrolled in Master in Astrophysics, High-energy Physics

Scientifc orientation: Doutora Violetta Sagun

 

Project 10 – Cooling of compact stars

Target: Students enrolled in Master in Astrophysics

Scientifc orientation: Doutora Violetta Sagun

 

Project 11 – Lattice computation of the Kugo-Ojima function

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor Paulo Silva e Professor Doutor Orlando Oliveira

 

Project 12 – PT-QED

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor Orlando Oliveira

 

Project 13 – Deep generative models for materials discovery

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics

Scientifc orientation: Doutor Márcio Ferreira e Doutor Tiago Cerqueira

 

Project 14 – Nuclear matteer properties: Supervised Machine Learning Approach

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics

Scientifc orientation: Doutor Márcio Ferreira e Professora Doutora Constança Providência

 

Project 15 – Cosmological generation of dark matter and baryonic matterTarget: Students enrolled in master’s in physics

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor João Rosa

 

Project 16 – Superradiant instabilities of primordial black holes

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor João Rosa

 

Project 17 – Calculation of superconducting properties of materials

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics or physics engineering

Scientifc orientation: Doutor Tiago Cerqueira e Professor Doutor Fernando Nogueira

 

Project 18 – Phase diagram of high-pressure ternary compounds

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics or physics engineering

Scientifc orientation: Doutor Tiago Cerqueira e Doutor Pedro Borlido

 

Project 19 – Study of the generation of Magnons in a Ni (111) slab

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics or physics engineering

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor Jaime Silva

 

Project 20 – Plasmons and Magneto Plasmons in graphene nanodisks

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics or physics engineering

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor Jaime Silva

 

Project 21 – Study of topological materials

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics or physics engineering

Scientifc orientation: Doutor Pedro Borlido e Professor Doutor Fernando Nogueira

 

Project 22 – Characterization of neutral-state and charged-state muonium in chalcopyrites used in solar cells

Target: Students enrolled in master’s in physics or physics engineering

Scientifc orientation: Professor Doutor Rui Vilão e Professora Doutora Helena Alberto.

 

Financial conditions: The amount of the fellowship is € 875,98 corresponding to the monthly compensation stipulated in the FCT table (https://www.fct.pt/apoios/bolsas/valores.phtml.en), plus social security (Seguro Social Voluntário, first level contributions) and personal accidents insurance. The payment will be made by bank transfer. This amount will not be increased during the entire period of the fellowship duration.

 

Selection methods: Curricular Evaluation (100%).

 

Selection criteria: The selection criteria to be used will be as follows:

- Curriculum vitae - (50%);

- Academic elements (list of classifications in all subjects) - (20%);

- Motivation letter identifying and justifying the project you would like to develop - (20%)

- Recommendation letter – 10%.

 

Jury responsible for selection: Professor Doutor José António de Carvalho Paixão, Professora Doutora Maria Constança Mendes Pinheiro da Providência Santarém e Costa, Professor Doutor João Carlos Lopes Carvalho e Professor Doutor Fernando Manuel Silva Nogueira.

 

Formalization of application: Applications must be formalized by sending the following

documents: Curriculum Vitae, Motivation Letter that should list by order of preference up to three projects, Recommendation Letter, Relevant documents, including a digital copy (PDF format) of bachelor's degree and the list of subjects taken.

 

Declaration on the honor of the candidate(s) with the indication of the fellowship(s) of the typology to which the contest was held and the respective duration(s).

 

Applicants with academic degrees obtained abroad will be required to present a Certificate of Recognition in accordance with applicable law. This document is mandatory only in the contractualization phase.

 

Applications submission: The applications should be sent by email to jap@uc.pt with copy to blc@uc.pt, with the text "Bolsas de Investigação CFisUC 2021/2022" in the subject, and with the documents indicated above attached.

 

Submission of applications: Between 23/02/2022 and 09/03/2022.

 

Submission deadline date: 09/03/2022.

 

Additional information: The evaluation results will be announced within 90 working days after the end of the applications submission deadline, by notifying the applicants via email. After the announcement of the results, candidates are considered automatically notified to, if they wish to do so, comment on the results on a preliminary hearing period within 10 days after that date. After this, the selected candidates will have to declare in writing their acceptance. Unless a justification worthy of consideration is presented, if the declaration is not submitted within the referred period, it is considered that the candidate waivers the fellowship. In case of resignation or withdrawal of the selected candidate, the next candidate with the highest evaluation score will be notified immediately.

Once the selection process is completed, the fellowship contract will be drawn up in accordance with the draft contract provided by the FCT.

After the contracted period, the fellowship holder and supervisor must prepare the final report in accordance with the respective assessment criteria that were established.

 

Selection reserve list: n/a

Work location(s)
5 position(s) available at
Universidade de Coimbra
Portugal
Coimbra
Rua Larga

EURAXESS offer ID: 746883

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