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EURAXESS

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Doctoral Network: Foundations for Offshore Wind Turbines (FRONTIErS) 2022-2026

The Human Resources Strategy for Researchers
09/12/2022

Job Information

Organisation/Company
University of Nottingham
Department
Engineering
Research Field
Engineering » Civil engineering
Engineering » Other
Researcher Profile
First Stage Researcher (R1)
Country
United Kingdom
Application Deadline
Type of Contract
Temporary
Job Status
Full-time
Offer Starting Date
Is the job funded through the EU Research Framework Programme?
HE / MSCA
Reference Number
101072360-FRONTIErS
Marie Curie Grant Agreement Number
101072360
Is the Job related to staff position within a Research Infrastructure?
No

Offer Description

Offer Description: Applications are invited for11 PhD positions (hereafter called Doctoral Candidates, DCs) to be funded by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Doctoral Network in Foundations foR Offshore wiNd TurbInES (FRONTIErS) under the European Commission Horizon Europe and UK Research and Innovation. DCs will be registered at one of four universities: University of Nottingham, UK; Delft University of Technology, NL; UPC Barcelona, Spain; or Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. DCs will be based either at one of these four universities or in one of four industrial hosts, namely: EDF, Paris, France; Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Norway; Esteyco, Spain; or SLPE, London, UK for the majority of their doctoral research, with secondment opportunities to spend time at a variety of other locations (including the host university).

Application Deadline: 31st January 2023, 23:59 – GMT. Late applications will not be considered.

Informal queries may be sent to luke.prendergast@nottingham.ac.uk. Do not send applications directly to this email address.

Requirements

Research Field
Engineering » Civil engineering
Education Level
Master Degree or equivalent
Skills/Qualifications

Candidates should have a primary degree or masters in civil engineering or a related-discipline. Candidates who already have already achieved a doctoral award are not eligible to apply.

Specific Requirements

Strong numeracy skills are required.

Specific technical requirements vary according to the type of project applied to, see individual research project descriptions below.

Provable proficiency in English is required.

Languages
ENGLISH
Level
Good
Research Field
Engineering » Civil engineering

Additional Information

Benefits

Successful candidates will receive a highly competitive salary in accordance with MSCA regulations for Doctoral Candidates. Salary range will be available from recruiting organisations before interviews. The salary includes living allowance, a mobility allowance, and a family allowance (if applicable). DC employment is expected for a period of 36 months.

Eligibility criteria

Candidates must meet all MSCA DC eligibility requirements, including the Mobility Rule. Eligibility requirements are outlined in the following: https://rea.ec.europa.eu/system/files/2021-06/DN%202021%20-%20Guide%20for%20Applicants.pdf

Selection process

Send CV and brief 1-page maximum motivation letter to frontiers.eu@gmail.com. Applicants must mention which project (Projects 1-11, see below) to which you wish to apply. Candidates must explain how you meet the eligibility criteria as outlined below. Please note that by submitting an application you are consenting to your data being shared among a recruitment committee in various countries.

Successful applicants will be invited to interview either in-person or online by approximately April 2023. Should you be successful at this stage, you will be invited to formally apply to the university host for your project, for the purpose of doctoral award enrolment. It is anticipated that you would begin your project employment prior to August 2023.

Application Deadline: 31st January 2023, 23:59 – CET. Late applications will not be considered.

Informal queries may be sent to luke.prendergast@nottingham.ac.uk. Do not send applications directly to this email address.

Additional comments

Description of the FRONTIErS Doctoral Network:  

The offshore wind sector has experienced rapid growth in recent years, with new turbine technologies, increased sizes and construction locations further from the shore in deeper waters than ever before. A critical challenge for future developments is the lack of knowledge surrounding how to design foundations to support these turbines, with the safety, life-span, cost and environmental implications coming increasingly into question. To maintain Europe’s stance as a world-leader in offshore wind, Foundations foR Offshore wiNd TurbInES (FRONTIErS) Doctoral Network has been designed to bring together research-intensive universities and major industry stakeholders to train the next generation of researchers with the appropriate skills to tackle the emerging issues presenting as a barrier to continued development of the sector. 11 talented Doctoral Candidates (DC) will undergo training via individual guided research projects, network-wide discipline-specific and transferrable training events, and local training at each host, during a 36 month employment contract. DCs will receive training in innovation, communication, commercialisation and entrepreneurship as well as undertaking specific modules in business development to arm them with the requisite all-round skills to excel in academic or industry careers. A tailored dissemination strategy will govern outputs and ensure that the research reaches wider audiences, both scientific and public, through a variety of media. The secondment strategy is designed to expose DCs to both academic and industry environments to foster an appreciation for the requirements of each sector and to enable research translation. Where a DC’s research makes an appropriate contribution to its field of science, the candidate will be awarded a doctorate degree from one of four world-leading academic institutions partaking in the programme. FRONTIErS will create the next generation of high-skilled professionals, who will be in high-demand in this expanding sector.

Doctoral Research Project descriptions:

Doctoral Project 1: “EXPLORE” Understanding the impact of soil variability on foundation installation and performance

Primary Location: Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, Norway.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

This project will explore the impact of statistical variability on design parameters required for accurate estimation of the operating behaviour of pile and caisson foundations deployed to support offshore turbines. The project will use site data to investigate the relation between spatial variability in the surrounding soil volume of a foundation and the derivation of a shear strength profile from CPT measurement, stiffness response, rate effect, and soil damping. The project will undertake parametric studies for both foundation types in the centrifuge at TU Delft.

 

Doctoral Project 2: “CYCLIC-TENS” Effect of cyclic loading on axial capacity of pile foundations

Primary Location: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

This project will investigate the mechanical response of offshore foundations (monopiles and anchors for floating structures) under cyclic loads. A particular focus will be on cyclic tension loading and the influence of mean cyclic load and the cyclic amplitude on the stiffness and axial capacity will be investigated. The potential beneficial effects of aging will be considered. The use of ground improvement techniques to increase the foundation performance will be investigated. The employment of these techniques is expected to increase the service life of both new and existing offshore structures. This is expected to reduce the costs and to improve the sustainability of offshore structures for renewable energy production, thus facilitating the energy transition. Particular attention will be given to the behaviour of the improved soil, potentially damaged by the application of a large number of load cycles. This project will include model tests in the centrifuge on a range of foundation geometries, full scale tests and cyclic element testing on improved soils.

 

Doctoral Project 3: “EXTEND” Extensive testing on physical pile aging effects for capacity

Primary Location: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

This project will investigate the physical mechanisms influencing pile aging under vertical and lateral loading. A recent joint-industry project has shown that over a period between 100 and 1,000 days after installation by driving, pile capacities increase to double those estimated using industry standard CPT-based design approaches, which could influence the lateral behaviour through distributed moments on large-diameter monopiles. However, there are some notable outliers in the result, e.g. tests performed in the Port of Rotterdam suggest that the increase in pile capacity due to aging is very sensitive to the pile geometry. This project will include full-scale and centrifuge (laboratory) scale load tests on a range of pile geometries.

 

Doctoral Project 4: “MONODYN” A Masing’s-based CPT dynamic model for large-diameter monopiles incorporating scour effects

Primary Location: Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, Norway.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

This project will further develop a novel CPT-based multi-spring model for analysing the monotonic response of large-diameter monopiles and extend it to modelling dynamic soil-pile interaction under scour. The model comprising p-y, m-theta, base shear and moment springs will utilise cone penetration test data (CPT) to inform backbone curves for Masing-type hysteresis. Further refinement of the small-strain regime will be provided by in-situ and laboratory measurements of Gmax. The predicted dynamic behavior will be benchmarked/validated using centrifuge testing of long-run cyclic experiments. The model will then be extended to capture scour effects, whereby the overburden reductions due to scour will be modelled as a change in the ultimate resistance of the respective backbone curves for each spring type. This will then be validated using centrifuge modelling of scoured piles performed at the University of Nottingham. Supporting element laboratory testing will be incorporated through ongoing work at NGI in Oslo.

 

Doctoral Project 5: “MONO-JACK-3D” Robust foundation modelling accounting for time and spatially-varying soil conditions over a turbine lifetime

Primary Location: Electricite De France (EDF), Paris, France

Doctoral Award Enrolment: UPC Barcelona, Spain

This project will investigate the effect of temporal and spatial variability in ground conditions on the 3D structural behavior of jackets and monopiles. Two industrial cases will be explored, the first one deals with the uncertainty in the depth of different stratified layers which can lead (for jacket substructures) to differences in behavior of adjacent jacket legs and thus can increase fatigue damage. The second case deals with time-varying oscillations in seabed (global scour) which change the level of the mudline over the lifetime of a turbine exacerbating fatigue. The project will be achieved by developing a robust methodology to account for these two effects.

Doctoral Project 6: “AX-RESIST” The Axial resistance of pipe piles driven in high strength soils

Primary Location: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

Recent CPT design methods provide reliable estimates of the separate components of axial resistance, namely the shaft and base resistance of piles in either sand or clay. In the offshore environment many piles are installed in mixed deposits, in the North Sea, high-strength sands are often interbedded with clay lenses, whilst at many locations offshore France, Scotland and Ireland, superficial deposits are underlain by rock. The bearing capacity and stiffness of piles installed in these soils are highly uncertain. This project will focus on (i) interpretation of a series of instrumented pile load tests on piles installed in dense Pleistocene sands with interbedded stiff clay layers tested in the Maasvlakte 2 area of the North Sea, in the Port of Rotterdam.(ii) Advanced finite element analyses will be performed investigating the impact of stiff clay lenses embedded in sand, or fractured rock profiles on the axial resistance and stiffness of open-ended piles.

 

Doctoral Project 7: “NU-PILE” Numerical modelling of monopile driving

Primary Location: UPC Barcelona, Spain

Doctoral Award Enrolment: UPC Barcelona, Spain

This project goal is to develop and test a realistic modelling platform to represent the dynamic interaction during installation of monopiles in soils. Coupled hydro-mechanical behaviour will be considered for the soil, allowing for drained, undrained or partly drained installation. Installations by vibration and hammering will be considered. Representation of the monopile will aim to reproduce the dynamic driving signals recorded at installation. Being able to correctly reproduce installation will open new fundamental perspectives into monopile design for both lateral and axial loading. Model development will be based on the Geotechnical Particle Finite Element method (GPFEM) which at present has been applied mostly to quasi-static hydro-mechanical coupled problems, but has been already adapted to high frequency dynamic loading.

 

Doctoral Project 8: “GB-SCOUR” Gravity Based Structures (GBS) - Analysis of scour development and protection optimization

Primary Location: Esteyco, Spain

Doctoral Award Enrolment: UPC Barcelona, Spain

This project analyses scour development around offshore GBS to optimise design scour procedures. Foundation scour is well established in bridge engineering, where scour depth is linked to the diameter/width of structural elements. This translates to offshore monopiles and jackets relatively easily, but leads to over-estimation in scour for GBS, which have variable cross-sections. This project will include computational fluid dynamic analyses to develop a scour design approach for GBS systems with varying sections and scaled model tests. This project will also develop an optimisation model for GBS scour protection, optimised to the scour conditions that are established. Focus on material optimisation and type (rock-armour, concrete mattresses, synthetic weeds) and pre-installation requirements prior to deployment.

 

Doctoral Project 9: “MULTI-LOAD” Influence of multi-directional loading on stiffness and strength degradation under monotonic and cyclic conditions for monopiles

Primary Location: Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

This project will develop a 1:20 experimental model of a monopile in a 4m x 4m x 3m test tank filled with dry sand. The pile will be monotonically loaded to failure with multi-directional loading applied to assess the influence on the stiffness and strength properties. The accumulation of deformation under one-way and multi-directional load cycling will also be tested for a range of load eccentricities. The project will additionally focus on load-interaction effects for a range of emerging monopile geometries (decreasing L/D ratios).

 

Doctoral Project 10: “CENCYC” Centrifuge testing of cyclic loading of foundations: effect of cyclic load ratio and installation method

Primary Location: University of Nottingham, UK

Doctoral Award Enrolment: University of Nottingham, UK

This project will investigate the effect of long-term cyclic loading (1000s of cycles) on the performance parameters (displacement/rotation) of foundations. The prediction of wind turbine foundation response to cyclic loading under complex loading regimes remains uncertain, particularly in light of forecasted extreme weather patterns due to climate change, therefore the long-term useability of foundations requires investigation. This project will make use of novel experimental developments at Nottingham’s centrifuge facility, which enable efficient actuation of hundreds of thousands of loading cycles on foundation systems, as well as in-flight variation of the cyclic load ratio (changing from one-way to two-way loading). The project will also consider the effect of installation method of the foundation systems (wished-in-place or driven) to ascertain the effect on the foundation response to loading.

 

Doctoral Project 11: “SOIL-MASS-DAMP” Estimation of added soil mass and damping for offshore wind turbines

Primary Location: SLPE, London, UK

Doctoral Award Enrolment: University of Nottingham, UK

In this project, recently developed Finite-Element model updating approaches that estimate soil mass contribution to dynamic motion of piles will be extended to estimating mass and damping in the nonlinear response range. The influence of added soil mass is often ignored in simplified dynamic soil-structure interaction models, due to difficulties in estimating its contribution to the dynamic motion. Soil is often assumed to only provide a stiffness. Moreover, quantifying the damping behaviour of various geo-materials remains a challenge. The existing FE updating procedure can only be applied to data for small-strain (linear) vibrations and only focusses on mass and stiffness updating. The successful candidate will expand the approach to the nonlinear (large-strain) range of cyclic motions and estimate mass, (operational) stiffness and damping using centrifuge modelling of piles subjected to dynamic loading and the development of representative numerical models of these systems. These models will be updated (mass, damping, stiffness) based on the response features from the test piles.

Description of the FRONTIErS Doctoral Network:  

The offshore wind sector has experienced rapid growth in recent years, with new turbine technologies, increased sizes and construction locations further from the shore in deeper waters than ever before. A critical challenge for future developments is the lack of knowledge surrounding how to design foundations to support these turbines, with the safety, life-span, cost and environmental implications coming increasingly into question. To maintain Europe’s stance as a world-leader in offshore wind, Foundations foR Offshore wiNd TurbInES (FRONTIErS) Doctoral Network has been designed to bring together research-intensive universities and major industry stakeholders to train the next generation of researchers with the appropriate skills to tackle the emerging issues presenting as a barrier to continued development of the sector. 11 talented Doctoral Candidates (DC) will undergo training via individual guided research projects, network-wide discipline-specific and transferrable training events, and local training at each host, during a 36 month employment contract. DCs will receive training in innovation, communication, commercialisation and entrepreneurship as well as undertaking specific modules in business development to arm them with the requisite all-round skills to excel in academic or industry careers. A tailored dissemination strategy will govern outputs and ensure that the research reaches wider audiences, both scientific and public, through a variety of media. The secondment strategy is designed to expose DCs to both academic and industry environments to foster an appreciation for the requirements of each sector and to enable research translation. Where a DC’s research makes an appropriate contribution to its field of science, the candidate will be awarded a doctorate degree from one of four world-leading academic institutions partaking in the programme. FRONTIErS will create the next generation of high-skilled professionals, who will be in high-demand in this expanding sector.

Doctoral Research Project descriptions:

Doctoral Project 1: “EXPLORE” Understanding the impact of soil variability on foundation installation and performance

Primary Location: Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, Norway.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

This project will explore the impact of statistical variability on design parameters required for accurate estimation of the operating behaviour of pile and caisson foundations deployed to support offshore turbines. The project will use site data to investigate the relation between spatial variability in the surrounding soil volume of a foundation and the derivation of a shear strength profile from CPT measurement, stiffness response, rate effect, and soil damping. The project will undertake parametric studies for both foundation types in the centrifuge at TU Delft.

 

Doctoral Project 2: “CYCLIC-TENS” Effect of cyclic loading on axial capacity of pile foundations

Primary Location: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

This project will investigate the mechanical response of offshore foundations (monopiles and anchors for floating structures) under cyclic loads. A particular focus will be on cyclic tension loading and the influence of mean cyclic load and the cyclic amplitude on the stiffness and axial capacity will be investigated. The potential beneficial effects of aging will be considered. The use of ground improvement techniques to increase the foundation performance will be investigated. The employment of these techniques is expected to increase the service life of both new and existing offshore structures. This is expected to reduce the costs and to improve the sustainability of offshore structures for renewable energy production, thus facilitating the energy transition. Particular attention will be given to the behaviour of the improved soil, potentially damaged by the application of a large number of load cycles. This project will include model tests in the centrifuge on a range of foundation geometries, full scale tests and cyclic element testing on improved soils.

 

Doctoral Project 3: “EXTEND” Extensive testing on physical pile aging effects for capacity

Primary Location: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

This project will investigate the physical mechanisms influencing pile aging under vertical and lateral loading. A recent joint-industry project has shown that over a period between 100 and 1,000 days after installation by driving, pile capacities increase to double those estimated using industry standard CPT-based design approaches, which could influence the lateral behaviour through distributed moments on large-diameter monopiles. However, there are some notable outliers in the result, e.g. tests performed in the Port of Rotterdam suggest that the increase in pile capacity due to aging is very sensitive to the pile geometry. This project will include full-scale and centrifuge (laboratory) scale load tests on a range of pile geometries.

 

Doctoral Project 4: “MONODYN” A Masing’s-based CPT dynamic model for large-diameter monopiles incorporating scour effects

Primary Location: Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo, Norway.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

This project will further develop a novel CPT-based multi-spring model for analysing the monotonic response of large-diameter monopiles and extend it to modelling dynamic soil-pile interaction under scour. The model comprising p-y, m-theta, base shear and moment springs will utilise cone penetration test data (CPT) to inform backbone curves for Masing-type hysteresis. Further refinement of the small-strain regime will be provided by in-situ and laboratory measurements of Gmax. The predicted dynamic behavior will be benchmarked/validated using centrifuge testing of long-run cyclic experiments. The model will then be extended to capture scour effects, whereby the overburden reductions due to scour will be modelled as a change in the ultimate resistance of the respective backbone curves for each spring type. This will then be validated using centrifuge modelling of scoured piles performed at the University of Nottingham. Supporting element laboratory testing will be incorporated through ongoing work at NGI in Oslo.

 

Doctoral Project 5: “MONO-JACK-3D” Robust foundation modelling accounting for time and spatially-varying soil conditions over a turbine lifetime

Primary Location: Electricite De France (EDF), Paris, France

Doctoral Award Enrolment: UPC Barcelona, Spain

This project will investigate the effect of temporal and spatial variability in ground conditions on the 3D structural behavior of jackets and monopiles. Two industrial cases will be explored, the first one deals with the uncertainty in the depth of different stratified layers which can lead (for jacket substructures) to differences in behavior of adjacent jacket legs and thus can increase fatigue damage. The second case deals with time-varying oscillations in seabed (global scour) which change the level of the mudline over the lifetime of a turbine exacerbating fatigue. The project will be achieved by developing a robust methodology to account for these two effects.

Doctoral Project 6: “AX-RESIST” The Axial resistance of pipe piles driven in high strength soils

Primary Location: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Delft University of Technology, Netherlands.

Recent CPT design methods provide reliable estimates of the separate components of axial resistance, namely the shaft and base resistance of piles in either sand or clay. In the offshore environment many piles are installed in mixed deposits, in the North Sea, high-strength sands are often interbedded with clay lenses, whilst at many locations offshore France, Scotland and Ireland, superficial deposits are underlain by rock. The bearing capacity and stiffness of piles installed in these soils are highly uncertain. This project will focus on (i) interpretation of a series of instrumented pile load tests on piles installed in dense Pleistocene sands with interbedded stiff clay layers tested in the Maasvlakte 2 area of the North Sea, in the Port of Rotterdam.(ii) Advanced finite element analyses will be performed investigating the impact of stiff clay lenses embedded in sand, or fractured rock profiles on the axial resistance and stiffness of open-ended piles.

 

Doctoral Project 7: “NU-PILE” Numerical modelling of monopile driving

Primary Location: UPC Barcelona, Spain

Doctoral Award Enrolment: UPC Barcelona, Spain

This project goal is to develop and test a realistic modelling platform to represent the dynamic interaction during installation of monopiles in soils. Coupled hydro-mechanical behaviour will be considered for the soil, allowing for drained, undrained or partly drained installation. Installations by vibration and hammering will be considered. Representation of the monopile will aim to reproduce the dynamic driving signals recorded at installation. Being able to correctly reproduce installation will open new fundamental perspectives into monopile design for both lateral and axial loading. Model development will be based on the Geotechnical Particle Finite Element method (GPFEM) which at present has been applied mostly to quasi-static hydro-mechanical coupled problems, but has been already adapted to high frequency dynamic loading.

 

Doctoral Project 8: “GB-SCOUR” Gravity Based Structures (GBS) - Analysis of scour development and protection optimization

Primary Location: Esteyco, Spain

Doctoral Award Enrolment: UPC Barcelona, Spain

This project analyses scour development around offshore GBS to optimise design scour procedures. Foundation scour is well established in bridge engineering, where scour depth is linked to the diameter/width of structural elements. This translates to offshore monopiles and jackets relatively easily, but leads to over-estimation in scour for GBS, which have variable cross-sections. This project will include computational fluid dynamic analyses to develop a scour design approach for GBS systems with varying sections and scaled model tests. This project will also develop an optimisation model for GBS scour protection, optimised to the scour conditions that are established. Focus on material optimisation and type (rock-armour, concrete mattresses, synthetic weeds) and pre-installation requirements prior to deployment.

 

Doctoral Project 9: “MULTI-LOAD” Influence of multi-directional loading on stiffness and strength degradation under monotonic and cyclic conditions for monopiles

Primary Location: Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Doctoral Award Enrolment: Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

This project will develop a 1:20 experimental model of a monopile in a 4m x 4m x 3m test tank filled with dry sand. The pile will be monotonically loaded to failure with multi-directional loading applied to assess the influence on the stiffness and strength properties. The accumulation of deformation under one-way and multi-directional load cycling will also be tested for a range of load eccentricities. The project will additionally focus on load-interaction effects for a range of emerging monopile geometries (decreasing L/D ratios).

 

Doctoral Project 10: “CENCYC” Centrifuge testing of cyclic loading of foundations: effect of cyclic load ratio and installation method

Primary Location: University of Nottingham, UK

Doctoral Award Enrolment: University of Nottingham, UK

This project will investigate the effect of long-term cyclic loading (1000s of cycles) on the performance parameters (displacement/rotation) of foundations. The prediction of wind turbine foundation response to cyclic loading under complex loading regimes remains uncertain, particularly in light of forecasted extreme weather patterns due to climate change, therefore the long-term useability of foundations requires investigation. This project will make use of novel experimental developments at Nottingham’s centrifuge facility, which enable efficient actuation of hundreds of thousands of loading cycles on foundation systems, as well as in-flight variation of the cyclic load ratio (changing from one-way to two-way loading). The project will also consider the effect of installation method of the foundation systems (wished-in-place or driven) to ascertain the effect on the foundation response to loading.

 

Doctoral Project 11: “SOIL-MASS-DAMP” Estimation of added soil mass and damping for offshore wind turbines

Primary Location: SLPE, London, UK

Doctoral Award Enrolment: University of Nottingham, UK

In this project, recently developed Finite-Element model updating approaches that estimate soil mass contribution to dynamic motion of piles will be extended to estimating mass and damping in the nonlinear response range. The influence of added soil mass is often ignored in simplified dynamic soil-structure interaction models, due to difficulties in estimating its contribution to the dynamic motion. Soil is often assumed to only provide a stiffness. Moreover, quantifying the damping behaviour of various geo-materials remains a challenge. The existing FE updating procedure can only be applied to data for small-strain (linear) vibrations and only focusses on mass and stiffness updating. The successful candidate will expand the approach to the nonlinear (large-strain) range of cyclic motions and estimate mass, (operational) stiffness and damping using centrifuge modelling of piles subjected to dynamic loading and the development of representative numerical models of these systems. These models will be updated (mass, damping, stiffness) based on the response features from the test piles.

Work Location(s)

Number of offers available
1
Company/Institute
University of Nottingham,
Country
United Kingdom
Geofield
Number of offers available
3
Company/Institute
TU Delft
Country
Netherlands
Geofield
Number of offers available
1
Company/Institute
SLPE
Country
United Kingdom
Geofield
Number of offers available
2
Company/Institute
NGI
Country
Norway
Number of offers available
1
Company/Institute
ESTEYCO
Country
Spain
Number of offers available
1
Company/Institute
EDF
Country
France
Geofield
Number of offers available
1
Company/Institute
UNIVERSITAT POLITECNICA DE CATALUNYA
Country
Spain
Number of offers available
1
Company/Institute
NTNU
Country
Norway

Where to apply

E-mail
frontiers.eu@gmail.com

Contact

City
Nottingham
Street
University Park, Nottingham, UK
Postal Code
NG9 2RD
E-Mail
frontiers.eu@gmail.com